Cream Cheese Hot Artichoke Dip Recipe

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easy homemade Hot Artichoke Dip recipe

You really should try making a hot artichoke dip at home, it’s do easy and delicious.

I apologize that this is only my seventh post this month and already I am making another of The Pioneer Woman’s recipes. However, the real one at blame here is Trader Joe’s, who wanted to charge me four dollars for a small container of Parmesan artichoke dip.  I almost bought it, but realized that except for the cream cheese, I knew I had everything I needed to make it myself.  Luckily the price on a block of cream cheese at TJ’s is much more affordable than what they were charging for the dip.

I am at a loss to explain why you should make this.  I guess it’s more of a question of why you wouldn’t. I’ve had a lot of different restaurant artichoke dips before, and even the “bad” ones are generally good enough to eat the whole thing and then be too full for the entrée.  While I don’t know if I’d classify this one as the best of the best, it certainly fills that craving that only artichoke dip can fill, and it makes A LOT, so overall it is much less expensive than anything you’ll buy at the store or a restaurant.

First. Why you should definitely include artichoke in your recipes. Lets look at its benefits.

 

What are the Health Benefits Of Artichoke?

 

artichoke sliced benefits for health

The artichoke is a vegetable plant of the family Asteraceae, whose flower bud is mainly consumed. Rich in fiber, minerals, vitamin B9 and trace elements, it has many beneficial effects for your health. It stimulates the liver, promotes urinary elimination and fights against cellular aging.

 

Scientific name: Cynara scolymus

Common names: artichoke, berigoule, artichoke, globe artichoke

Botanical Classification: Asteraceae family)

Forms and preparations: infusions, capsules, tablets

Native to the Mediterranean basin, artichoke is a great ally to treat dyspepsia. This is a set of symptoms of pain or discomfort of the upper abdomen, with an origin in the upper gastrointestinal tract. As a dietary supplement, its use is also appropriate to relieve digestive disorders and potentially to reduce cholesterol levels. Its active ingredient, cynarine, belongs to the family of polyphenols.

Depending on the severity of the pain you need to relieve, the recommended dose varies, which is why it is necessary to consult your doctor before starting a course of treatment. If you suffer from gallstones, it is mandatory to consult your doctor.

Choleretic and depurative: stimulates bile secretion and bile removal. Diuretic due to its richness in potassium and inulin. Its fibers facilitate intestinal transit. Vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidant compounds of the plant play a protective role. The polyphenols that artichoke contains would help fight liver cancer and its fiber content, colon cancer. Rich in vitamin B9, artichoke reduces the risk of neural tube defects in the fetus.

Also Read:  Caramelized Onion Dip Recipe - Homemade & Easy

External use

Not really suitable for external use.

Common therapeutic properties

In herbal medicine, artichoke improves difficult digestion, helps treat hepatobiliary dysfunctions( jaundice, liver failure, etc.), bloating and nausea ; facilitates renal and urinary elimination ; fights constipation by stimulating bile secretion.

Other demonstrated therapeutic indications

Artichoke helps prevent Type II diabetes by regulating blood sugar levels. It also helps prevent cardiovascular disease by limiting atheromas in the arteries.

Botanical description of artichoke

Artichoke, or Cynara scolymus, is a non-spiny, domesticated variety of wild Thistle. It is a herbaceous plant of the Asteraceae family. It is characterized by its rigid and fluted STEM up to 2 m in height, its leaves similar to those of Thistle, but not spiny. Native to the Mediterranean basin, it grows on rich and drained soils, under temperate and warm climates (mainly in Spain, Italy, Brittany).

Parts of artichoke commonly used

The flower bud is the edible part of the artichoke, but it is the leaves that grow along the stem, which contain the most active ingredients.

Active ingredients

Artichoke leaf contains cynarine or dicafeylquinic acid, a bitter aromatic substance, with choleretic properties. It also contains inulin and potassium, which have diuretic properties. Artichoke folates (vitamin B9) alone cover one-third of our daily needs. The fibers of the artichoke facilitate digestion and intestinal transit. Artichoke leaf also contains flavonoids, fructose, minerals, vitamins and sterols.

Dosage

In the form of capsules or tablets containing 3-5% cynarine: 400-600 mg per day, or 200 mg per intake, two or three times a day.

Dried leaves: 6 g per day in 3 takes.

Infusion: 1 teaspoon infused for ten minutes in boiling water. Drink 1 cup before each meal.

Precautions for the use of artichoke

A continued use of high dosages of artichoke should not exceed fifteen days.

Artichoke Contraindications

Taking artichoke is contraindicated in case of cholelithiasis (obstruction of the bile ducts). It is also not recommended in case of sensitivity to Asteraceae, such as chamomile or Daisy.

Some side effects may be noted : diarrhea, gas and temporary loss of appetite.
Interactions with medicinal plants or supplements

Artichoke mixed with boldo or fumeterre facilitates digestion. After a meal that is too high in fat, it is advisable to consume artichoke with turmeric. To treat biliary insufficiency, artichoke and Linden sapwood are mixed. To stimulate the gallbladder, a mixture of artichoke and boldo is used.

No known drug interaction.

 

(Please excuse lack of a picture of it hot out of the oven.  I think we got a little antsy to eat it.)

Easy Homemade Creamy Hot Artichoke Dip Recipe with Parmesan Cheese and Mayonnaise

Adapted from The Pioneer Woman Cooks

Also Read:  Easy Homemade Chipotle Recipe

Things I did differently: I left out the cayenne because I’m a wuss with anything hot, and I used light cream cheese, well, for no good reason at all.  I imagine it would taste better with regular.  Things I would do differently next time: I would use at least one more kind of cheese, probably Asiago or Fontina (or both), and I might add a little lemon, just to brighten it up a bit.

  • Two 14-oz cans artichoke hearts, drained
  • One 8-oz block cream cheese
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • Cayenne pepper
  • 2 green onions, chopped
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • Dash of salt
  • Freshly ground pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Add one can of the artichokes, the cream cheese, and the mayonnaise to the food processor. (If you don’t have a food processor, do smaller batches in the blender, or simply chop and stir together.) Sprinkle in cayenne pepper to taste. Add the green onions to the bowl as well.  Pulse the mixture 6 or 7 times just enough to get everything mixed.  Mix in the Parmesan and add salt and pepper to taste, and set aside.

Now, roughly chop the artichokes from the remaining can.  Add the artichoke pieces to the dip and stir together until incorporated.  Pour the mixture into an oven-safe dish and bake for 15 – 20 minutes, until heated through and bubbly.   Serve with a baguette, tortilla chips, or your favorite crackers.

Hot Artichoke Dip Recipe
 
Ingredients
  • Two 14-oz cans artichoke hearts, drained
  • One 8-oz block cream cheese
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • Cayenne pepper
  • 2 green onions, chopped
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • Dash of salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Add one can of the artichokes, the cream cheese, and the mayonnaise to the food processor. (If you don’t have a food processor, do smaller batches in the blender, or simply chop and stir together.) Sprinkle in cayenne pepper to taste. Add the green onions to the bowl as well.  Pulse the mixture 6 or 7 times just enough to get everything mixed.  Mix in the Parmesan and add salt and pepper to taste, and set aside.
  2. Now, roughly chop the artichokes from the remaining can.  Add the artichoke pieces to the dip and stir together until incorporated.  Pour the mixture into an oven-safe dish and bake for 15 – 20 minutes, until heated through and bubbly.   Serve with a baguette, tortilla chips, or your favorite crackers.
 

Enjoy!

If you like homemade dip sauces try my caramelized onion dip recipe too 😉

Have you made cream cheese hot artichoke dip at home? Let me know in the comments below.

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